History of Eastway/Sheffield Neighborhoods

“This is the most talked about house of 1953…” – Charlotte Observer, April 14, 1954

In 1954, Eastway Park became the home of one of Life’s “Trade Secrets” Houses. The design incorporated all the best and most desirable design elements of the times into one cutting edge house plan. Leading developers across the country, like Charlotte’s Stratford House Company, built copies of the house, one of which still stands on Optimist Lane.

 

Architectural History

Many of the houses in the Eastway/Sheffield neighborhoods were built by Ervin Building Company and featured ROW windows.

Historic Resources for Ranch and Split Level Houses

Check out these resources on our historic homes, as they’re a great snapshot of 1950s and 1960s architecture and style.  They’re also solidly built, as the Ervin Construction Company used basic, but durable materials like brick, stone, and ashlar concrete in addition to high-quality lumber (i.e real 2″ x 4″s)

Although the resources below are from Georgia’s State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), our houses in Eastway Park/Sheffield Park share many regional traits, including regional materials. These are interesting and useful if you’re considering routine maintenance or a renovation.

Got a ranch house? Check these out.

Ranch House styles Powerpoint overview of ranch houses in Southeastern U.S.

Ranch House types Powerpoint overview of ranch house types in Southeastern U.S.

Ranch House Evaluation Sept 2010 An AMAZING resource for everything from windows and doors to materials like brick and ashlar concrete.

Got a split level house?  Check this out.

Split Level houses

Memories of Eastway/Sheffield:

“When my husband and I were newlyweds looking for a home we couldn’t agree on one. One day we were driving down Independence Boulevard and saw a big sign that said, ‘See yourself living in fashionable Eastway Park.'” (They went on to buy the lot and build one of the first houses in the neighborhood.)

“When I was a little girl I remember we would come visit my mom’s friend in Eastway Park. At the entrance of the neighborhood there was a little tree that looked like a Christmas tree and I loved looking at it through the car window.” (That “little Christmas tree” is now a very tall pine tree!)

“Eastway park was part of Black’s dairy farm. Much of Eastway Middle School was the pond for the farm. Evergreen nature preserve was a military training site.

“Ervin construction basically set the standard for building codes…when the county implemented building codes, whatever Ervin did, became the standard because they built such solid houses.”